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Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Salvation: IWSG October 2018



It's IWSG Day. The goal of this blog hop is to share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds. IWSG is the brainchild of Alex Cavanaugh, our brilliant ninja leader.  Co-Hosts for October Dolorah @ Book Lover, Christopher D. Votey, Tanya Miranda, and Chemist Ken!

This month’s optional question: How do major life events affect your writing? Has writing ever helped you through something?


Well, duh!

Any writing I accomplished prior was a lead-up to the place I landed one day in 2009, when after 23 years at the same organization my position was eliminated in a large-scale expense reduction. In at 8:00 as usual, out at 4:00, forever—with no notice and certainly no plan. The next day I woke up and the only way I could handle the shock of having been dumped on my proverbial keister was to write. The resulting essay became my first post here on Middle Passages and almost ten years later it’s one of the pieces of which I remain the most proud. Sure I’d edit it now, tighten it up.  But it was real, from the gut, gritty…and, it had voice. 

So, Middle Passages was born and through this medium, I took my first steps on the journey toward what I am today—settled, comfortable and proud of what I’ve accomplished. The early day-to-day writing—along with subsequent articles, essays, and yes, those pesky unpublished novels, well, they're my joy, and I suppose my legacy. You'll find the real me, the person I always wanted to be here and in the other pieces I produce. No matter what the topic, writing comes from as deep as I can go, and all of it, every word I've written since, stems from that first day of unemployment.

There I sat at my kitchen counter, weighed down by a white-space-vacuum-lack-of-purpose, but as soon as I began to write, my panic slipped away. I became focused on finding the exact word, imbuing the piece with the flavor of my crisis and my hope. Hours later, I pressed publish for the first time knowing I'd started something good, something that mattered, and aware in the gut-honest-heart of me that no matter what the future introduced, writing had to be a part of it.

I've carried forth in that regard ever since, because one thing that remains crystal clear. Writing doesn't just help. It's salvation.


14 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Leaving the real you behind is a great thing to leave as a legacy.
And from that day, look how far you've come...

Jennifer Hawes said...

Writing with purpose. I like that! Sometimes we have to go through the tough times to find out what we're made of.

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

This - "...knowing I'd started something good, something that mattered, and aware in the gut-honest-heart of me that no matter what the future introduced, writing had to be a part of it." Love it! :)

Pat Garcia said...

There's an explicit knowing that develops when we began to write. Somehow, unknowingly to us, we dig deep and frustration is released. We find ourselves. I'm so happy that you're writing. Continue on.
All the best.

Shalom aleichem,
Pat G @ EverythingMustChange

Julie Flanders said...

What an inspiring post. I didn't realize you went through such a shocking experience. So glad writing helped you. It really can be a lifesaver.

Chemist Ken said...

Although my transition to a new job didn't exactly compel me to write, it certainly helped. Now I'm addicted to writing, and wouldn't want it any other way.

Chris Votey said...

A major event happened to me in life that did allow me to cross things off of my writing bucket-list. My injury that left me disabled. I am proud of what I have done, but it has come at a great price. So much so, I'd give anything to undo what happened to me. Perhaps that would affect my writing, but I published my first book a month before my accident and was already started on my next book, so i don't think the impact would be that severe if I could undo my past.

emaginette said...

Amazing how getting thoughts down can help. :-)

Anna from elements of emaginette

Natalie Aguirre said...

Glad you found your path after being laid off. I was too after as many years on my job but it was a four year process to layoff. I'm happy with a less stressful contract writing job even if it is low paying.

Connie said...

Writing has always been for me both an escape and a way of organizing my thoughts and understanding whatever I may be experiencing at the moment. Salvation is a very good word to use to describe that feeling.

Joanne said...

and everything happens for a reason - so cliche and yet true.
You were meant to be a writer and a photographer
Also,I know you had family stuff too that affected your writing...
it made you stronger.
You are SO good. Do not ever doubt anything and keep writing.
That's all I can say from TX.

Kalpanaa M said...

Your post sent shivers down my spine. What a terrible experience to go through to launch yourself as a writer. Fabulous contribution to the optional prompt.

dolorah said...

I started writing after a job loss too, but sadly had to return to work as soon as I landed another job. But writing has opened up a whole new world for me. I just wish I had time to do more of it. Someday soon, I shall retire, and spend my days writing :)

mshatch said...

I agree. I may take a break when something happens or I'm sick, but I could never not write.